We all know and love Colonial Williamsburg, that small historic district in Virginia where middle school field trips and quaint living abounds on its cobblestone streets. And this Halloween, there will be even more reason to head over to the colonial town:

In addition to its annual celebrations on All Hallow’s Eve, Colonial Williamsburg will, for the first time, allow visitors to stay in the city’s infamous Haunted Colonial Houses.

While guests in the past have been able to stay in the town’s Colonial Houses, this year, intrepid visitors will be enlightened to each house’s haunted past — the properties will be especially decorated for Halloween and workers will clue guests in to the stories that have haunted each house. The houses will be outfitted to resemble a cottage of the times: a crackling fire will dance in the fireplace, canopy beds to welcome brave guests, and… Perhaps a ghoul or two will pay a visit!

In the past, these houses have been reported to have paranormal activity — people have reported seeing a woman in traditional dress rocking in a chair at night, smelling a distinct tobacco odor at odd times, hearing strange murmuring, and even getting a glance of founding father Thomas Jefferson’s ghost.

The houses can be reserved for $216 per night, which includes admittance to the weekend’s various Halloween activities — including horror movie screenings, square dances, haunted houses, and the “Curse of the Sea Witch” event.

So hop on your horse and head down to Colonial Williamsburg for the fright of your life!

Get out outside today, and enjoy the freedoms so many have sacrificed so much to protect. • 📷: @mairin.hayes #colonialwilliamsburg

A photo posted by Colonial Williamsburg (@colonialwmsburg) on

What’s the scariest place you’ve ever traveled to for Halloween? Let us know in the comments!


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About The Author

Mary Zakheim
Content Writer

When she is not figuring out what the middle button on her headphones is for, explaining the difference between Washington State and Washington D.C., arriving to the airport too early or refusing to use the Oxford comma, you can usually find Mary in the mountains, at a show or on her couch. Mary is a content writer at Fareportal and likes annoying her coworkers with weird GIFs throughout the day.